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  • Authors: Lagerberg, Julia;

    Rust or dry out? Objects made of iron and wood require different conservation conditions. Iron needs an RH, lower than 18% so as not to rust while wood wants as much as an RH of 50% so as not to dry out. Will a compromise on an RH of 30% be used at an exhibition, so that as much as possible of the object can be protected for the future even if the object will be destroyed over time? Techniques, chemicals and storage that are applied to one material can break down the other, causing problems with preservation. PEG impregnation, which is a good treatment for degraded wood, has a PH value of 4 and iron rusts at a PH of less than 9. One possibility is to add an inhibitor to the PEG solution, which increases the PH value, possibly overlay the iron part so that it does not come into contact with the PEG solution and then freeze-dry the object. By finally treating the iron with a rust protection, an RH that applies to wood can be applied. Another conceivable feature is choosing which material to keep. Can ICOM's professional ethics rules then be applied practically to these objects, for example in terms of ethics, minimum possible action and reversibility? Uppsats för avläggande av filosofie kandidatexamen i Kulturvård, Konservatorprogrammet 15 hp Institutionen för kulturvård Göteborgs universitet 2019:19

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  • Authors: Fort, Johan;

    Blasting with carbon dioxide is a technology that since the mid- 1940s and onwards has been developed for the industry for the finishing of different surfaces. The technique however, has not until the end of the 1970 and 80's come to play any important role in the industry, and only in recent years has this method come to be used in conservation activities. Traditional blasting media and dry ice functions partly under the same conditions, a difference however, is that the carbon dioxide sublimates after use, this consequently results in no generated waste in the form of spent blasting media except for removed surface layer. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how the blasting technique with solid carbon dioxide works, its different advantages and disadvantages, and how it is used in the restoration and preservation works in Sweden and abroad. The essay begins with a simple review of traditional blasting techniques and media to aid the reader's understanding of blasting, and highlight differences and similarities between the different systems. The essay is primarily a literature review in which I gratefully used the work of others. A simple case study has also been carried out in cooperation with the Gothenburg-based blasting company IS_AB , ISBLÄSTRINGSAKTIEBOLAGET GOTHENBURG . The purpose of this case study was to investigate whether carbon dioxide blasting technique is suitable for stone conservation, where the goal is to remove various types of unwanted coatings and finishes such as wax, different types of doodles and such. Besides using solid carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide is used in liquid and supercritical state in the industry and in the conservation world, these techniques comes because of limited space, only to be presented in the chapter 10- further research Uppsats för avläggande av filosofie kandidatexamen i Kulturvård, Konservatorsprogrammet 15 hp Institutionen för kulturvård Göteborgs universitet 2014:49

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Jenkins, Skyler;

    Bioapatite or hydroxyapatite (HAP) is a biocomposite and the main component of hard tissues such as bones and teeth. Owing to its unique physical and chemical properties, synthetically produced hydroxyapatite has found extensive applications in medicine and dentistry. More recently, the direct in situ formation of hydroxyapatite through reaction chemistries between calcium-rich matrices in stone, wall paintings, and bone, and ammonium phosphate precursors induced via a wet-chemistry route, has been explored as a potential inorganic mineral consolidant for cultural heritage artifacts. Building on previous studies, this research tests a new multi-step process to control the deposition, crystal formation and growth of HAP on archaeological bone, through the application of calcium hydroxide colloids, collagen, and diammonium phosphate precursors. Here we describe the step-by-step approach for the application of precursors, formation of HAP and the methods of evaluation based on the characterization of the chemistry and microstructure of pre-consolidated and consolidated bone, and the evaluation of optical and mechanical properties of consolidated samples.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ eScholarship - Unive...arrow_drop_down
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
  • Authors: Karlsson, Jennie;

    This essay focuses on the disposal of archaeological material within archaeological fieldwork in Sweden. It explores how archaeological finds are valued and treated in the field with reference to current Swedish regulatory texts and guidelines, and seeks to identify aspects that – directly or indirectly – decide which material is disposed of in the field. Furthermore, it seeks to identify potential problems in the line of actions that ultimately results in the disposal of an archaeological find. The methodology used to investigate the questions asked is a combination of literary studies and a questionnaire composed of questions concerning the disposal of archaeological materials in the field sent out to field archaeologists working in western Sweden. The conclusion is that the disposal of archaeological material in the field is a complex topic, and that there are many aspects – including personal opinions, regional research traditions and varying sizes of examination budgets – that affect the disposal decisions.

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The following results are related to Heritage Science. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4 Research products (1 rule applied)
  • Authors: Lagerberg, Julia;

    Rust or dry out? Objects made of iron and wood require different conservation conditions. Iron needs an RH, lower than 18% so as not to rust while wood wants as much as an RH of 50% so as not to dry out. Will a compromise on an RH of 30% be used at an exhibition, so that as much as possible of the object can be protected for the future even if the object will be destroyed over time? Techniques, chemicals and storage that are applied to one material can break down the other, causing problems with preservation. PEG impregnation, which is a good treatment for degraded wood, has a PH value of 4 and iron rusts at a PH of less than 9. One possibility is to add an inhibitor to the PEG solution, which increases the PH value, possibly overlay the iron part so that it does not come into contact with the PEG solution and then freeze-dry the object. By finally treating the iron with a rust protection, an RH that applies to wood can be applied. Another conceivable feature is choosing which material to keep. Can ICOM's professional ethics rules then be applied practically to these objects, for example in terms of ethics, minimum possible action and reversibility? Uppsats för avläggande av filosofie kandidatexamen i Kulturvård, Konservatorprogrammet 15 hp Institutionen för kulturvård Göteborgs universitet 2019:19

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  • Authors: Fort, Johan;

    Blasting with carbon dioxide is a technology that since the mid- 1940s and onwards has been developed for the industry for the finishing of different surfaces. The technique however, has not until the end of the 1970 and 80's come to play any important role in the industry, and only in recent years has this method come to be used in conservation activities. Traditional blasting media and dry ice functions partly under the same conditions, a difference however, is that the carbon dioxide sublimates after use, this consequently results in no generated waste in the form of spent blasting media except for removed surface layer. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how the blasting technique with solid carbon dioxide works, its different advantages and disadvantages, and how it is used in the restoration and preservation works in Sweden and abroad. The essay begins with a simple review of traditional blasting techniques and media to aid the reader's understanding of blasting, and highlight differences and similarities between the different systems. The essay is primarily a literature review in which I gratefully used the work of others. A simple case study has also been carried out in cooperation with the Gothenburg-based blasting company IS_AB , ISBLÄSTRINGSAKTIEBOLAGET GOTHENBURG . The purpose of this case study was to investigate whether carbon dioxide blasting technique is suitable for stone conservation, where the goal is to remove various types of unwanted coatings and finishes such as wax, different types of doodles and such. Besides using solid carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide is used in liquid and supercritical state in the industry and in the conservation world, these techniques comes because of limited space, only to be presented in the chapter 10- further research Uppsats för avläggande av filosofie kandidatexamen i Kulturvård, Konservatorsprogrammet 15 hp Institutionen för kulturvård Göteborgs universitet 2014:49

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Jenkins, Skyler;

    Bioapatite or hydroxyapatite (HAP) is a biocomposite and the main component of hard tissues such as bones and teeth. Owing to its unique physical and chemical properties, synthetically produced hydroxyapatite has found extensive applications in medicine and dentistry. More recently, the direct in situ formation of hydroxyapatite through reaction chemistries between calcium-rich matrices in stone, wall paintings, and bone, and ammonium phosphate precursors induced via a wet-chemistry route, has been explored as a potential inorganic mineral consolidant for cultural heritage artifacts. Building on previous studies, this research tests a new multi-step process to control the deposition, crystal formation and growth of HAP on archaeological bone, through the application of calcium hydroxide colloids, collagen, and diammonium phosphate precursors. Here we describe the step-by-step approach for the application of precursors, formation of HAP and the methods of evaluation based on the characterization of the chemistry and microstructure of pre-consolidated and consolidated bone, and the evaluation of optical and mechanical properties of consolidated samples.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ eScholarship - Unive...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ eScholarship - Unive...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
  • Authors: Karlsson, Jennie;

    This essay focuses on the disposal of archaeological material within archaeological fieldwork in Sweden. It explores how archaeological finds are valued and treated in the field with reference to current Swedish regulatory texts and guidelines, and seeks to identify aspects that – directly or indirectly – decide which material is disposed of in the field. Furthermore, it seeks to identify potential problems in the line of actions that ultimately results in the disposal of an archaeological find. The methodology used to investigate the questions asked is a combination of literary studies and a questionnaire composed of questions concerning the disposal of archaeological materials in the field sent out to field archaeologists working in western Sweden. The conclusion is that the disposal of archaeological material in the field is a complex topic, and that there are many aspects – including personal opinions, regional research traditions and varying sizes of examination budgets – that affect the disposal decisions.

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